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Definition of "subjective" []

  • Proceeding from or taking place in a person's mind rather than the external world: a subjective decision. (adjective)
  • Particular to a given person; personal: subjective experience. (adjective)
  • Moodily introspective. (adjective)
  • Existing only in the mind; illusory. (adjective)
  • Psychology Existing only within the experiencer's mind. (adjective)
  • Belonging to, proceeding from, or relating to the mind of the thinking subject and not the nature of the object being considered (adjective)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • Of, relating to, or emanating from a person's emotions, prejudices, etc (adjective)
  • Relating to the inherent nature of a person or thing; essential (adjective)
  • Existing only as perceived and not as a thing in itself (adjective)
  • (of a symptom, condition, etc) experienced only by the patient and incapable of being recognized or studied by anyone else (adjective)
  • Denoting a case of nouns and pronouns, esp in languages having only two cases, that identifies the subject of a finite verb and (in formal use in English) is selected for predicate complements, as in It is I (adjective)
  • The subjective case (noun)
  • A subjective word or speech element (noun)

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Use "subjective" in a sentence
  • "Laurence Urdang The phenomenon for which D.S. Bland proposes the term subjective onomatopoeia [XII, 2] has been examined and discussed for decades by a number of linguists and critics, including Otto Jespersen (with examples such as those of the - ump family cited by Bland), Edward S.pir (the ici and lá vowel contrast that Bland picks up from French), R.ssell Ultan (size and distance symbolism in general), J.R. Firth, Fred W. Householder, Jr.,"
  • "In view of this usage we are confronted with the passages in which the Latin word subjective must be translated as “objectively.”"
  • "There are, however, what we call subjective factors."