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Definition of "receiver" []

  • One that receives something: a receiver of many compliments. (noun)
  • Electronics A device, such as a part of a radio, television set, or telephone, that receives incoming radio signals and converts them to perceptible forms, such as sound or light. (noun)
  • An official appointed to receive and account for money due. (noun)
  • Law A person appointed by a court administrator to take into custody the property or funds of others, pending litigation. (noun)
  • A person who knowingly buys or receives stolen goods. (noun)
  • A person who receives something; recipient (noun)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • A person appointed by a court to manage property pending the outcome of litigation, during the infancy of the owner, or after the owner(s) has been declared bankrupt or of unsound mind (noun)
  • A person who receives stolen goods knowing that they have been stolen (noun)
  • The equipment in a telephone, radio, or television that receives incoming electrical signals or modulated radio waves and converts them into the original audio or video signals (noun)
  • The part of a telephone containing the earpiece and mouthpiece that is held by the telephone user (noun)
  • The equipment in a radar system, radio telescope, etc, that converts incoming radio signals into a useful form, usually displayed on the screen of a cathode-ray oscilloscope (noun)
  • A vessel in which the distillate is collected during distillation (noun)
  • A player whose function is to receive the ball, esp a footballer who catches long passes (noun)
  • The metallic frame situated behind the breech of a gun to guide the round into the chamber (noun)

www.Collinsdictionary.com (c) HarperCollins Publishers Ltd 2016

Use "receiver" in a sentence
  • "A type of receiver has come into wide use as a result, which is commonly called the _direct-current receiver_, deriving its name from the fact that it employs the direct current that is flowing in the common-battery line to magnetize the receiver cores."
  • "In order that they may have both of their hands free to set up and take down the connections and to perform all of the switching operations required, a special form of receiver is employed for this purpose, which is worn as a part of a head-gear and is commonly termed a _head receiver_."
  • "Needs to use his hands with more force in attempts to press and jam before the receiver is able to get into the route ..."