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Definition of "fundamental" []

  • Of or relating to the foundation or base; elementary: the fundamental laws of the universe. (adjective)
  • Forming or serving as an essential component of a system or structure; central: an example that was fundamental to the argument. (adjective)
  • Of great significance or entailing major change: a book that underwent fundamental revision. (adjective)
  • Physics Of or relating to the component of lowest frequency of a periodic wave or quantity. (adjective)
  • Physics Of or relating to the lowest possible frequency of a vibrating element or system. (adjective)
  • Of, involving, or comprising a foundation; basic (adjective)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • Of, involving, or comprising a source; primary (adjective)
  • Denoting or relating to the principal or lowest note of a harmonic series (adjective)
  • Of or concerned with the component of lowest frequency in a complex vibration (adjective)
  • A principle, law, etc, that serves as the basis of an idea or system (noun)
  • The principal or lowest note of a harmonic series (noun)
  • The bass note of a chord in root position (noun)
  • The component of lowest frequency in a complex vibration (noun)
  • The frequency of this component (noun)

www.Collinsdictionary.com (c) HarperCollins Publishers Ltd 2016

Use "fundamental" in a sentence
  • "Here we join issue with those Socialist writers who advocate the endowment of motherhood and give it their own meaning; and that is why in a preceding paragraph the word fundamental has been emphasized, since in the endowment of motherhood as understood by socialists there are two principles, one which I call fundamental, and a second -- that the endowment shall be by the State -- which now falls to be considered."
  • "There's no real harm in the use of the term fundamental in this context, but this is about where the word gets elevated beyond its usefulness and starts becoming a hurdle to progress, and then a barrier."
  • "But, of course, the danger in messing with anything this fundamental is the possibility of royally screwing things up."