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Definition of "disquisition" [dis•qui•si•tion]

  • A formal discourse on a subject, often in writing. (noun)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Use "disquisition" in a sentence
  • "The word disquisition has appeared in 15 New York Times articles in the past year, including on June 12 in the essay The Ahab Parallax: 'Moby"
  • "The principal view in this disquisition is to enable those, who have already learnt to draw, to make themselves easily masters of painting in any manner they may choose; by which assistance many persons of genius, who, from ignorance of the nature and use of colours, might be deterred from it, may be both induced & enabled to attempt painting successfully, and bring those talents into practice, which would be otherwise lost to the public and themselves."
  • "The principal view in this disquisition is to enable those, who have already learnt to draw, to make themselves easily masters of painting in any manner they may choose; by which assistance many persons of genius, who, from ignorance of the nature and use of colours, might be deterred from it, may be both induced and enabled to attempt painting successfully, and bring those talents into practice, which would be otherwise lost to the public and themselves."