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Definition of "close" [close]

  • Being near in space or time. See Usage Note at redundancy. (adjective)
  • Being near in relationship: close relatives. (adjective)
  • Bound by mutual interests, loyalties, or affections; intimate: close friends. (adjective)
  • Having little or no space between elements or parts; tight and compact: a close weave. (adjective)
  • Being near the surface; short: a close haircut. (adjective)
  • Near in space or time; in proximity (adjective)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • Having the parts near together; dense (adjective)
  • Down or near to the surface; short (adjective)
  • Near in relationship (adjective)
  • Intimate or confidential (adjective)
  • Almost equal or even (adjective)
  • Not deviating or varying greatly from a model or standard (adjective)
  • Careful, strict, or searching (adjective)
  • (of a style of play in football, hockey, etc) characterized by short passes (adjective)
  • Confined or enclosed (adjective)
  • Shut or shut tight (adjective)
  • Oppressive, heavy, or airless (adjective)
  • Strictly guarded (adjective)
  • Neat or tight in fit (adjective)
  • Secretive or reticent (adjective)
  • Miserly; not generous, esp with money (adjective)
  • (of money or credit) hard to obtain; scarce (adjective)
  • Restricted as to public admission or membership (adjective)
  • Hidden or secluded (adjective)
  • Restricted or prohibited as to the type of game or fish able to be taken (adjective)
  • Denoting a vowel pronounced with the lips relatively close together (adjective)
  • Closely; tightly (adverb)
  • Near or in proximity (adverb)

www.Collinsdictionary.com (c) HarperCollins Publishers Ltd 2016

Use "close" in a sentence
  • "While "The Devil Inside" remains my favorite GRENDEL story-arc, "God and the Devil" is a close *close* second."
  • "The notes sung by the voices are usually close to each other in pitch, resulting in “tight” chords, or “close” harmony."
  • "The soldiers being close together, -- in _close order_, -- they form a compact body that is easily managed, and consequently that lends itself well to teaching the soldier habits of attention, precision, team-work and instant obedience to the voice of his commander."