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Definition of "access" []

  • A means of approaching, entering, exiting, communicating with, or making use of: a store with easy access. (noun)
  • The ability or right to approach, enter, exit, communicate with, or make use of: has access to the restricted area; has access to classified material. (noun)
  • Public access. (noun)
  • An increase by addition. (noun)
  • An outburst or onset: an access of rage. (noun)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Use "access" in a sentence
  • "Slide 15: "iPhone and the changed rules of the game for mobile internet" by Ulrika Steg, Product Manager Consumer markets, TeliaSonera Ulrika presented the impact from the Launch of the iPhone.  28\% more data traffic in their 3G network after 1 week, since 160\% more data traffic  Most iPhone users browse outside their portal (the way it should have been everywhere from day 1 when internet access was possible on a mobile phone!) vs. non-iPhone users  User cost control important  iPhone users feel they have internet in a pocket  80\% of buyers men under age 35 and half live in big cities (I think this also depends on the fact that in big cities you do have 3G coverage, I know a friend of mine living out in the country in northern Sweden and as he put it, \ "you have to climb up in a f\%\%\%ing tree to get phone access\") The good thing about the iPhone launch, it forced the mobile operators to start thinking about how to offer value priced \ "flat-fee like\" data plans."
  • "This year's capital investment continues TELUS 'longstanding commitment to providing Albertans with access to some of the world's best telecommunications technology, including the fastest and biggest wireless network that Albertans can access*. ""
  • "*The term access capitalist was first used in a 1993 New Republic piece by Michael Lewis that was one of the first serious critiques of Carlyle."