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Definition of "succession" []

  • The act or process of following in order or sequence. (noun)
  • A group of people or things arranged or following in order; a sequence: "A succession of one-man stalls offered soft drinks” ( Alec Waugh). See Synonyms at series. (noun)
  • The sequence in which one person after another succeeds to a title, throne, dignity, or estate. (noun)
  • The right of a person or line of persons to so succeed. (noun)
  • The person or line having such a right. (noun)
  • The act or an instance of one person or thing following another (noun)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • A number of people or things following one another in order (noun)
  • The act, process, or right by which one person succeeds to the office, etc, of another (noun)
  • The order that determines how one person or thing follows another (noun)
  • A line of descent to a title, etc (noun)
  • The sum of the changes in the composition of a community that occur during its development towards a stable climax community (noun)

www.Collinsdictionary.com (c) HarperCollins Publishers Ltd 2016

Use "succession" in a sentence
  • "But if, time thus spreading itself out in space and succession becoming juxtaposition, science has nothing to change in what it tells us, we must conclude that, in what it tells us, it takes account neither of _succession_ in what of it is specific nor of _time_ in what there is in it that is fluent."
  • "Thus he says, "It is incumbent to obey the _presbyters_ who are in the Church, those who possess the succession from the apostles, and who together with the _succession of the episcopate_ have received the certain gift of truth." ..."
  • "Even Robert Hall (in his famous Sermon on Modern Infidelity) could but play, when he attempted grappling with the subject, upon the words _time_ and _eternity_, and strangely argue, that as each member of an infinite series must have begun in _time_, while the succession itself was _eternal_, it was palpably absurd to ask us to believe in a _succession_ of beings that was thus infinitely earlier than any of the beings themselves which composed the succession."