Definition of "refer" [re•fer]

  • To direct to a source for help or information: referred her to a heart specialist; referred me to his last employer for a recommendation. (verb-transitive)
  • To assign or attribute to; regard as originated by. (verb-transitive)
  • To assign to or regard as belonging within a particular kind or class. (verb-transitive)
  • To submit (a matter in dispute) to an authority for arbitration, decision, or examination. (verb-transitive)
  • To direct the attention of: refer him to his duties. (verb-transitive)
  • To make mention (of) (verb)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • To direct the attention of (someone) for information, facts, etc (verb)
  • To seek information (from) (verb)
  • To be relevant (to); pertain or relate (to) (verb)
  • To assign or attribute (verb)
  • To hand over for consideration, reconsideration, or decision (verb)
  • To hand back to the originator as unacceptable or unusable (verb)
  • To fail (a student) in an examination (verb)
  • To send back (a thesis) to a student for improvement (verb)
  • To direct (a patient) for treatment to another doctor, usually a specialist (verb)
  • To direct (a client) to another agency or professional for a service (verb)

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Use "refer" in a sentence
  • "Otherwise we are left either with the error-theoretic conclusion that there are no moral properties or the non-cognitivist conclusion that moral vocabulary does not even purport to refer (in the sense of ˜refer™ in play when one does serious metaphysics, anyway; again, the non-cognitivist will allow that we can ˜speak with the vulgar™ here)."
  • "The rules of the title refer to a collection of maxims assembled by George Washington that Tinker Grey regards as his bible."
  • "Another essential book everyone interested in U.S. politics should read is Gangs of America by Ted Nace, where the gangs in the title refer to corporations throughout U.S. history."