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Definition of "order" []

  • A condition of logical or comprehensible arrangement among the separate elements of a group. (noun)
  • A condition of methodical or prescribed arrangement among component parts such that proper functioning or appearance is achieved: checked to see that the shipping department was in order. (noun)
  • Condition or state in general: The escalator is in good working order. (noun)
  • The established system of social organization: "Every revolution exaggerates the evils of the old order” ( C. Wright Mills). (noun)
  • A condition in which freedom from disorder or disruption is maintained through respect for established authority: finally restored order in the rebellious provinces. (noun)
  • A state in which all components or elements are arranged logically, comprehensibly, or naturally (noun)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • An arrangement or disposition of things in succession; sequence (noun)
  • An established or customary method or state, esp of society (noun)
  • A peaceful or harmonious condition of society (noun)
  • A class, rank, or hierarchy (noun)
  • Any of the taxonomic groups into which a class is divided and which contains one or more families. Carnivora, Primates, and Rodentia are three orders of the class Mammalia (noun)
  • An instruction that must be obeyed; command (noun)
  • A decision or direction of a court or judge entered on the court record but not included in the final judgment (noun)
  • A commission or instruction to produce or supply something in return for payment (noun)
  • The commodity produced or supplied (noun)
  • (as modifier) (noun)
  • A procedure followed by an assembly, meeting, etc (noun)
  • A body of people united in a particular aim or purpose (noun)
  • A group of persons who bind themselves by vows in order to devote themselves to the pursuit of religious aims (noun)
  • A society of knights constituted as a fraternity, such as the Knights Templars (noun)
  • A group of people holding a specific honour for service or merit, conferred on them by a sovereign or state (noun)
  • The insignia of such a group (noun)
  • Any of the five major classical styles of architecture classified by the style of columns and entablatures used (noun)
  • Any style of architecture (noun)
  • The sacrament by which bishops, priests, etc, have their offices conferred upon them (noun)
  • Any of the degrees into which the ministry is divided (noun)
  • The office of an ordained Christian minister (noun)
  • A form of Christian Church service prescribed to be used on specific occasions (noun)
  • One of the six sections of the Mishna or the corresponding tractates of the Talmud (noun)
  • The number of times a function must be differentiated to obtain a given derivative (noun)
  • The order of the highest derivative in a differential equation (noun)
  • The number of rows or columns in a determinant or square matrix (noun)
  • The number of members of a finite group (noun)
  • To give a command to (a person or animal to do or be something) (verb)
  • To request (something) to be supplied or made, esp in return for payment (verb)
  • To instruct or command to move, go, etc (to a specified place) (verb)
  • To authorize; prescribe (verb)
  • To arrange, regulate, or dispose (articles) in their proper places (verb)
  • (of fate or the gods) to will; ordain (verb)
  • To ordain (verb)
  • An exclamation of protest against an infringement of established procedure (exclamation)
  • An exclamation demanding that orderly behaviour be restored (exclamation)

www.Collinsdictionary.com (c) HarperCollins Publishers Ltd 2016

Use "order" in a sentence
  • "~ Hidden order found in a quantum spin liquid -- An international team, including scientists from the London Centre for Nanotechnology, has detected a hidden magnetic “quantum order” that extends over chains of 100 atoms in a ceramic without classical magnetism."
  • "As Ablatives of Cause are to be reckoned also such Ablatives as jussū, by order of, injussū, _without the order_, rogātū, etc."
  • "The chief reasons for it are undoubtedly that (i.) the order of facts in Mark is the _normal order_ of the whole narrative of the Synoptists, and (ii.) in the main, the language of Mark explains the verbal agreements between Matt. and Luke."