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Definition of "nobleness" []

  • Of or relating to a hereditary class with special social or political status, often derived from a feudal period (adjective)
  • Of or characterized by high moral qualities; magnanimous (adjective)
  • Having dignity or eminence; illustrious (adjective)
  • Grand or imposing; magnificent (adjective)
  • Of superior quality or kind; excellent (adjective)
  • (of certain elements) chemically unreactive (adjective)
  • (of certain metals, esp copper, silver, and gold) resisting oxidation (adjective)
  • Designating long-winged falcons that capture their quarry by stooping on it from above (adjective)
  • Designating the type of quarry appropriate to a particular species of falcon (adjective)
  • A person belonging to a privileged social or political class whose status is usually indicated by a title conferred by sovereign authority or descent (noun)
  • (in the British Isles) a person holding the title of duke, marquess, earl, viscount, or baron, or a feminine equivalent (noun)
  • A former Brit gold coin having the value of one third of a pound (noun)
  • The quality or state of being noble; nobility or grandeur (noun)

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Use "nobleness" in a sentence
  • "'And year by year,' said Harding, 'I watched to see whether the direst want could bring you to humbleness, and saw you only grow in nobleness; and year by year I lay in wait for my four-footed quarry each Midsummer Eve beside the Wishing-Pool, and saw it grow in kingliness."
  • "I am already considered by the French nobility as Thomas de Longueville; you may personate the Red Reaver: Scotland does not yet know that he was slain; and the reputation of his valor and a certain nobleness in his wild warfare having placed him, in the estimation of our shores, rather in the light of one of their own island sea-kings than in that of his real character – a gallant, though fierce pirate, – the aid of his name would bring no evil odor to our joint appearance."
  • ""And year by year," said Harding, "I watched to see whether the direst want could bring you to humbleness, and saw you only grow in nobleness; and year by year I lay in wait for my four-footed quarry each Midsummer Eve beside the Wishing-Pool, and saw it grow in kingliness."