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Definition of "inculcate" [in•cul•cate]

  • To impress (something) upon the mind of another by frequent instruction or repetition; instill: inculcating sound principles. (verb-transitive)
  • To teach (others) by frequent instruction or repetition; indoctrinate: inculcate the young with a sense of duty. (verb-transitive)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Use "inculcate" in a sentence
  • "In a roundabout way Hern├índez teaches upper-middle-class kids a lesson that refined mothers used to inculcate from the cradle onward: If you've got it, don't flaunt it."
  • "Baqwa told Sapa the essence of the day was to "inculcate" a culture of human rights."
  • "Southern Command significantly broadened the school's core curriculum around the military doctrine of counterinsurgency warfare and expanded enrollment to train -- "inculcate" is the word Gill uses more than once -- Latin American militaries in the cause of anticommunism."