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Definition of "grace" []

  • Seemingly effortless beauty or charm of movement, form, or proportion. (noun)
  • A characteristic or quality pleasing for its charm or refinement. (noun)
  • A sense of fitness or propriety. (noun)
  • A disposition to be generous or helpful; goodwill. (noun)
  • Mercy; clemency. (noun)
  • Elegance and beauty of movement, form, expression, or proportion (noun)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • A pleasing or charming quality (noun)
  • Goodwill or favour (noun)
  • The granting of a favour or the manifestation of goodwill, esp by a superior (noun)
  • A sense of propriety and consideration for others (noun)
  • Affectation of manner (esp in the phrase airs and graces) (noun)
  • Mercy; clemency (noun)
  • The free and unmerited favour of God shown towards man (noun)
  • The divine assistance and power given to man in spiritual rebirth and sanctification (noun)
  • The condition of being favoured or sanctified by God (noun)
  • An unmerited gift, favour, etc, granted by God (noun)
  • A short prayer recited before or after a meal to invoke a blessing upon the food or give thanks for it (noun)
  • A melodic ornament or decoration (noun)
  • To add elegance and beauty to (verb)
  • To honour or favour (verb)
  • To ornament or decorate (a melody, part, etc) with nonessential notes (verb)

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Use "grace" in a sentence
  • "He could do the butchering of a hog with the best of grace, and had killed, first and last, so many, that I imagine he could tell the number of squeals, or wrigglings of the porcine tail it took to terminate the life of the animal, after he had given it the _coup de grace_."
  • "It is not a practiced, educated grace, but the “unbought grace” of his genius, uttering itself in its beauty and grandeur in the movements of the outward man."
  • "And grace to anfwer grace* v. But let us haften to the day H y Ki N. s« 229"