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Definition of "get" [get]

  • To come into possession or use of; receive: got a cat for her birthday. (verb-transitive)
  • To meet with or incur: got nothing but trouble for her efforts. (verb-transitive)
  • To go after and obtain: got a book at the library; got breakfast in town. (verb-transitive)
  • To go after and bring: Get me a pillow. (verb-transitive)
  • To purchase; buy: get groceries. (verb-transitive)
  • To come into possession of; receive or earn (verb)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • To bring or fetch (verb)
  • To contract or be affected by (verb)
  • To capture or seize (verb)
  • To become or cause to become or act as specified (verb)
  • To succeed in going, coming, leaving, etc (verb)
  • To manage or contrive (verb)
  • To make ready or prepare (verb)
  • To hear, notice, or understand (verb)
  • To learn or master by study (verb)
  • To come (to) or arrive (at) (verb)
  • To catch or enter (verb)
  • To induce or persuade (verb)
  • To reach by calculation (verb)
  • To receive (a broadcast signal) (verb)
  • To communicate with (a person or place), as by telephone (verb)
  • To have an emotional effect (on) (verb)
  • To annoy or irritate (verb)
  • To bring a person into a difficult position from which he or she cannot escape (verb)
  • To puzzle; baffle (verb)
  • To hit (verb)
  • To be revenged on, esp by killing (verb)
  • To gain access (to a person) with the purpose of bribing him or her (verb)
  • To obtain access (to someone) and kill or silence him or her (verb)
  • To have the better of (verb)
  • To begin (verb)
  • Go! leave now! (verb)
  • To beget or conceive (verb)
  • The act of begetting (noun)
  • Something begotten; offspring (noun)
  • (in tennis, squash, etc) a successful return of a shot that was difficult to reach (noun)

www.Collinsdictionary.com (c) HarperCollins Publishers Ltd 2016

Use "get" in a sentence
  • "Rather than making it harder to get divorced, which would cause problems for people in abusive situations, why not just make it harder to *get* married?"
  • "Even beyond that most people in the province probably know residents who had never shown an interest in jigging a cod before they were told they couldn’t, and those same residents were among the first to decide they simply had to get out and “get their fish."
  • "Yes, -- and, to confirm my suspicions, here rattle in the drums and pipe in the fifes, wooing us to get up, _get up_, with music too peremptory to be harmonious."