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Definition of "gauged" []

  • To measure or determine the amount, quantity, size, condition, etc, of (verb)
  • To estimate or appraise; judge (verb)
  • To check for conformity or bring into conformity with a standard measurement, dimension, etc (verb)
  • A standard measurement, dimension, capacity, or quantity (noun)
  • Any of various instruments for measuring a quantity (noun)
  • Any of various devices used to check for conformity with a standard measurement (noun)
  • A standard or means for assessing; test; criterion (noun)
  • Scope, capacity, or extent (noun)
  • The diameter of the barrel of a gun, esp a shotgun (noun)
  • The thickness of sheet metal or the diameter of wire (noun)
  • The distance between the rails of a railway track: in Britain 4 ft 81⁄2 in. (1.435 m) (noun)
  • The distance between two wheels on the same axle of a vehicle, truck, etc (noun)
  • The position of a vessel in relation to the wind and another vessel. One vessel may be windward (weather gauge) or leeward (lee gauge) of the other (noun)
  • The proportion of plaster of Paris added to mortar to accelerate its setting (noun)
  • The distance between the nails securing the slates, tiles, etc, of a roof (noun)
  • A measure of the fineness of woven or knitted fabric, usually expressed as the number of needles used per inch (noun)
  • The width of motion-picture film or magnetic tape (noun)
  • (of a pressure measurement) measured on a pressure gauge that registers zero at atmospheric pressure; above or below atmospheric pressure (adjective)
  • Simple past tense and past participle of gauge. (verb)

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Use "gauged" in a sentence
  • "The next thing that has to be gauged is the quality of the sale itself."
  • "The magnitude of dependence can be gauged from the fact each day over 400 containers ply from Karachi and Quetta to Afghanistan transporting food, munitions and 300 million gallons of fuel for US-Nato troops in Afghanistan."
  • "The extent to which agreement had been reached in 1961 may be gauged from the two opening paragraphs of the joint"