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Definition of "fulness" []

  • Holding or containing as much as possible; filled to capacity or near capacity (adjective)
  • Abundant in supply, quantity, number, etc (adjective)
  • Having consumed enough food or drink (adjective)
  • (esp of the face or figure) rounded or plump; not thin (adjective)
  • With no part lacking; complete (adjective)
  • With all privileges, rights, etc; not restricted (adjective)
  • Of, relating to, or designating a relationship established by descent from the same parents (adjective)
  • Filled with emotion or sentiment (adjective)
  • Occupied or engrossed (with) (adjective)
  • Powerful or rich in volume and sound (adjective)
  • Completing a piece or section; concluding (adjective)
  • (of a garment, esp a skirt) containing a large amount of fabric; of ample cut (adjective)
  • (of sails, etc) distended by wind (adjective)
  • (of wine, such as a burgundy) having a heavy body (adjective)
  • (of a colour) containing a large quantity of pure hue as opposed to white or grey; rich; saturated (adjective)
  • Drunk (adjective)
  • Completely; entirely (adverb)
  • (in combination) (adverb)
  • Exactly; directly; right (adverb)
  • Very; extremely (esp in the phrase full well) (adverb)
  • The greatest degree, extent, etc (noun)
  • A ridge of sand or shingle along a seashore (noun)
  • To gather or tuck (verb)
  • (of the moon) to be fully illuminated (verb)
  • Being full; completeness. (noun)

www.Collinsdictionary.com (c) HarperCollins Publishers Ltd 2016

  • The degree to which a space is full. (noun)
  • The degree to which fate has become known. (noun)
  • : A measure of the degree to which a muscle has increased in size parallel to the axis of its contraction. A full muscle fills more of the space along the part of the body where it is connected. (noun)

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Use "fulness" in a sentence
  • "It is the unsuspected forces, hidden to the eyes of men, -- the forces imprisoned in the soil and the stimuli of alternating flash of light and the gloomings of darkness these and many others will be found to maintain the ceaseless activity which we know as the fulness of throbbing life."
  • "So uncertain is all that which we call fulness in the creature, 1 Sam. ii."
  • "By the following September Helen shows improvement in fulness of construction and more extended relations of thought."