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Definition of "evolution" []

  • A gradual process in which something changes into a different and usually more complex or better form. See Synonyms at development. (noun)
  • The process of developing. (noun)
  • Gradual development. (noun)
  • Biology Change in the genetic composition of a population during successive generations, as a result of natural selection acting on the genetic variation among individuals, and resulting in the development of new species. (noun)
  • Biology The historical development of a related group of organisms; phylogeny. (noun)
  • A gradual change in the characteristics of a population of animals or plants over successive generations: accounts for the origin of existing species from ancestors unlike them (noun)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • A gradual development, esp to a more complex form (noun)
  • The act of throwing off, as heat, gas, vapour, etc (noun)
  • A pattern formed by a series of movements or something similar (noun)
  • An algebraic operation in which the root of a number, expression, etc, is extracted (noun)
  • An exercise carried out in accordance with a set procedure or plan (noun)

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Use "evolution" in a sentence
  • "This is the only possible policy of the revolutionary class, a policy arising directly from the _actual evolution_ of capitalistic militarism, in fact, dictated by the evolution."
  • "So we think of evolution going on in mankind, evolution chequered by involution, but on the whole _progressive evolution_."
  • "I consider the foregoing investigation as sufficient to prove the very extraordinary and important principle with respect to WATER, _that when subjected to the influence of the electric current, a quantity of it is decomposed exactly proportionate to the quantity of electricity which has passed_, notwithstanding the thousand variations in the conditions and circumstances under which it may at the time be placed; and further, that when the interference of certain secondary effects (742. &c.), together with the solution or recombination of the gas and the evolution of air, are guarded against, _the products of the decomposition may be collected with such accuracy, as to afford a very excellent and valuable measurer of the electricity concerned in their evolution_."