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Definition of "dummy" []

  • An imitation of a real or original object, intended to be used as a practical substitute. (noun)
  • A mannequin used in displaying clothes. (noun)
  • A figure of a person or an animal manipulated by a ventriloquist. (noun)
  • A stuffed or pasteboard figure used as a target. (noun)
  • Football A heavy stuffed cylindrical bag used for blocking and tackling practice. (noun)
  • A figure representing the human form, used for displaying clothes, in a ventriloquist's act, as a target, etc (noun)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • A copy or imitation of an object, often lacking some essential feature of the original (noun)
  • (as modifier) (noun)
  • A stupid person; fool (noun)
  • A person without the power of speech; mute (noun)
  • A person who says or does nothing (noun)
  • A person who appears to act for himself or herself while acting on behalf of another (noun)
  • A weighted round without explosives, used in drill and training (noun)
  • The hand exposed on the table by the declarer's partner and played by the declarer (noun)
  • The declarer's partner (noun)
  • A prototype of a proposed book, indicating the general appearance and dimensions of the finished product (noun)
  • A designer's layout of a page indicating the positions for illustrations, etc (noun)
  • A feigned pass or move in a sport such as football or rugby (noun)
  • A rubber teat for babies to suck or bite on (noun)
  • Counterfeit; sham (noun)
  • (of a card game) played with one hand exposed or unplayed (noun)
  • To prepare a dummy of (a proposed book, page, etc) (verb)
  • To use a dummy pass in order to trick (an opponent) (verb)

www.Collinsdictionary.com (c) HarperCollins Publishers Ltd 2016

Use "dummy" in a sentence
  • "To be shed of such a dummy is a GOOD thing for Alaskans."
  • "Sen. Levin decried what he called "dummy assets" in the CDO, which help boost the rating and then were replaced at the last minute with lower quality assets, and called emails exchanged among S&P analysts, discussing Delphinus, "just devastating as to the kind of culture that was going on here.""
  • "I have not been convinced by what the Air Force claimed and, of course, what I call the dummy drop theory of Roswell doesn't satisfy anyone, even the skeptics tended to laugh at that."