Advertisement

Definition of "divine" []

  • Having the nature of or being a deity. (adjective)
  • Of, relating to, emanating from, or being the expression of a deity: sought divine guidance through meditation. (adjective)
  • Being in the service or worship of a deity; sacred. (adjective)
  • Superhuman; godlike. (adjective)
  • Supremely good or beautiful; magnificent: a divine performance of the concerto. (adjective)
  • Of, relating to, or characterizing God or a deity (adjective)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • Godlike (adjective)
  • Of, relating to, or associated with religion or worship (adjective)
  • Of supreme excellence or worth (adjective)
  • Splendid; perfect (adjective)
  • A priest, esp one learned in theology (noun)
  • To perceive or understand (something) by intuition or insight (verb)
  • To conjecture (something); guess (verb)
  • To discern (a hidden or future reality) as though by supernatural power (verb)
  • To search for (underground supplies of water, metal, etc) using a divining rod (verb)

www.Collinsdictionary.com (c) HarperCollins Publishers Ltd 2016

Use "divine" in a sentence
  • "According to this interpretation, the phrase “the nature of the divine and the good” refers simply to a characteristic that is attributed to Pyrrho, and labeled by poetic hyperbole as ˜divine™, in another fragment of Timon, namely his extraordinary tranquillity; the couplet as a whole, then, is saying that tranquillity is the source of an even-tempered life."
  • "_ It should appear that Moses believed with the Egyptians the divine emanation of souls: according to him, _ "God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul:" _ nevertheless, the Catholic, at this day, rejects this system of _divine emanation, _ seeing that it supposes the"
  • "Actions committed by a divine principle are _divine actions_; whereas the actions of the creature, however good they may appear, are"