Advertisement

Definition of "broken" []

  • Past participle of break. (verb)
  • Forcibly separated into two or more pieces; fractured: a broken arm; broken glass. (adjective)
  • Sundered by divorce, separation, or desertion of a parent or parents: children from broken homes; a broken marriage. (adjective)
  • Having been violated: a broken promise. (adjective)
  • Incomplete: a broken set of books. (adjective)
  • Fractured, smashed, or splintered (adjective)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • Imperfect or incomplete; fragmentary (adjective)
  • Interrupted; disturbed; disconnected (adjective)
  • Intermittent or discontinuous (adjective)
  • Varying in direction or intensity, as of pitch (adjective)
  • Not functioning (adjective)
  • Spoilt or ruined by divorce (esp in the phrases broken home, broken marriage) (adjective)
  • (of a trust, promise, contract, etc) violated; infringed (adjective)
  • Overcome with grief or disappointment (adjective)
  • (of the speech of a foreigner) imperfect in grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation (adjective)
  • Made tame or disciplined by training (adjective)
  • Exhausted or weakened as through ill-health or misfortune (adjective)
  • Confused or disorganized (adjective)
  • Breached or opened (adjective)
  • Irregular or rough; uneven (adjective)
  • Bankrupt or out of money (adjective)
  • (of colour) having a multicoloured decorative effect, as by stippling paint onto a surface (adjective)
  • Drunk (adjective)

www.Collinsdictionary.com (c) HarperCollins Publishers Ltd 2016

Use "broken" in a sentence
  • "Not, only was the iron and the clay broken by the impact, but "the iron, the clay, _the brass, the silver, and the gold_" were "_broken to pieces_ TOGETHER, and became like the chaff of the summer threshing-floors" (verse 35)."
  • ""Out of this," says Mr. Wilson, "we coined the phrase 'broken windows,' suggesting public order is a fragile thing, and if you don't fix the first broken window, soon all the windows will be broken.""
  • "Mr. Wilson is most famous for the phrase "broken windows," but he is quick to point out that it didn't originate with him."