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Definition of "blast" [blast]

  • A very strong gust of wind or air. (noun)
  • The effect of such a gust. (noun)
  • A forcible stream of air, gas, or steam from an opening, especially one in a blast furnace to aid combustion. (noun)
  • A sudden loud sound, especially one produced by a stream of forced air: a piercing blast from the steam whistle. (noun)
  • The act of producing such a sound: gave a blast on his trumpet. (noun)
  • An explosion, as of dynamite (noun)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • The rapid movement of air away from the centre of an explosion, combustion of rocket fuel, etc (noun)
  • A wave of overpressure caused by an explosion; shock wave (noun)
  • The charge of explosive used in a single explosion (noun)
  • A sudden strong gust of wind or air (noun)
  • A sudden loud sound, as of a trumpet (noun)
  • A violent verbal outburst, as of criticism (noun)
  • A forcible jet or stream of air, esp one used to intensify the heating effect of a furnace, increase the draught in a steam engine, or break up coal at a coalface (noun)
  • Any of several diseases of plants and animals, esp one producing withering in plants (noun)
  • A very enjoyable or thrilling experience (noun)
  • An exclamation of annoyance (esp in phrases such as blast it! and blast him!) (exclamation)
  • To destroy or blow up with explosives, shells, etc (verb)
  • To make or cause to make a loud harsh noise (verb)
  • To remove, open, etc, by an explosion (verb)
  • To ruin; shatter (verb)
  • To wither or cause to wither; blight or be blighted (verb)
  • To criticize severely (verb)
  • To shoot or shoot at (verb)

www.Collinsdictionary.com (c) HarperCollins Publishers Ltd 2016

Use "blast" in a sentence
  • "IV. vii.155 (308,9) blast in proof] This, I believe, is a metaphor taken from a mine, which, in the proof or execution, sometimes breaks out with an ineffectual _blast_."
  • "I grew up on a diet of stock-car racing at the long-defunct Walthamstow Stadium in the Sixties, and the term "blast from the past" could not be more apt."
  • "People here say that the -- what they call blast walls, which are basically large concrete barriers, or large containers filled with dirt, had been erected in front of the embassy, and that those blast walls probably absorbed about 90 percent of the explosive impact of that suicide bomb."