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Definition of "bar" [bar]

  • A relatively long, straight, rigid piece of solid material used as a fastener, support, barrier, or structural or mechanical member. (noun)
  • A solid oblong block of a substance, such as soap or candy. (noun)
  • A rectangular block of a precious metal. (noun)
  • Sports A horizontal bar. (noun)
  • Sports A horizontal rod that marks the height to be cleared in high jumping or pole vaulting. (noun)
  • A rigid usually straight length of metal, wood, etc, that is longer than it is wide or thick, used esp as a barrier or as a structural or mechanical part (noun)

American Heritage(R) Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright (c) 2011 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

  • A solid usually rectangular block of any material (noun)
  • Anything that obstructs or prevents (noun)
  • An offshore ridge of sand, mud, or shingle lying near the shore and parallel to it, across the mouth of a river, bay, or harbour, or linking an island to the mainland (noun)
  • An alluvial deposit in a stream, river, or lake (noun)
  • A counter or room where alcoholic drinks are served (noun)
  • A counter, room, or establishment where a particular range of goods, food, services, etc, are sold (noun)
  • A narrow band or stripe, as of colour or light (noun)
  • A heating element in an electric fire (noun)
  • (in England) the area in a court of law separating the part reserved for the bench and Queen's Counsel from the area occupied by junior barristers, solicitors, and the general public (noun)
  • The place in a court of law where the accused stands during his trial (noun)
  • A particular court of law (noun)
  • (in the House of Lords and House of Commons) the boundary where nonmembers wishing to address either House appear and where persons are arraigned (noun)
  • A plea showing that a plaintiff has no cause of action, as when the case has already been adjudicated upon or the time allowed for bringing the action has passed (noun)
  • Anything referred to as an authority or tribunal (noun)
  • A group of beats that is repeated with a consistent rhythm throughout a piece or passage of music. The number of beats in the bar is indicated by the time signature (noun)
  • Insignia added to a decoration indicating a second award (noun)
  • A strip of metal worn with uniform, esp to signify rank or as an award for service (noun)
  • Part of the metal mouthpiece of a horse's bridle (noun)
  • The space between the horse's teeth in which such a part fits (noun)
  • Either of two horny extensions that project forwards and inwards from the rear of the outer layer of a horse's hoof (noun)
  • An ordinary consisting of a horizontal line across a shield, typically narrower than a fesse, and usually appearing in twos or threes (noun)
  • A superscript line ⁻ placed over a letter symbol to indicate, for example, a mean value or the complex conjugate of a complex number (noun)
  • To fasten or secure with a bar (verb)
  • To shut in or out with or as if with barriers (verb)
  • To obstruct; hinder (verb)
  • To prohibit; forbid (verb)
  • To keep out; exclude (verb)
  • To mark with a bar or bars (verb)
  • To prevent or halt (an action) by showing that the claimant has no cause (verb)
  • To mark off (music) into bars with bar lines (verb)
  • Except for (preposition)

www.Collinsdictionary.com (c) HarperCollins Publishers Ltd 2016

Use "bar" in a sentence
  • "I'm not going to pretend that these or any granola bar, a category of foods filled with high-fructose corn syrup and other stuff is any healthier than a candy bar*, but it's so damned good."
  • "It must be remembered that the boats had entered the Niger by the _Brass_ river, the bar of which was _his bar_, and that he had bargained to act as pilot through its mouth, so that there was ample excuse for the poor wretch; this, however, in no degree lessened the danger of the position in which the little _Lark_ was placed."
  • "The currents are very rapid, and carry with them quantities of sand, which the sea throws back towards the coast; this it is that forms a bar at the mouth of the river; but the currents have opened themselves a passage, which is called the _pass of the bar_."