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Definition of "advantages" []

  • Superior or more favourable position or power (noun)
  • Benefit or profit (esp in the phrase to one's advantage) (noun)
  • The point scored after deuce (noun)
  • The resulting state of the score (noun)
  • Plural form of advantage. (noun)

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  • Third-person singular simple present indicative form of advantage. (verb)

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Use "advantages" in a sentence
  • "Countries therefore which do not enjoy these advantages, must gain by commerce with those which do; because the exchanges of commerce are between _labor and labor_; subtraction being made of all the natural advantages which are combined with these labors; and it is evidently the most favored countries which can incorporate into a given labor the largest proportion of these _natural advantages_."
  • "It was he, too, who laid before Lady Southdown the great advantages which might occur from an intimacy between her family and Miss Crawley, —advantages both worldly and spiritual, he said: for Miss Crawley was now quite alone; the monstrous dissipation and alliance of his brother Rawdon had estranged her affections from that reprobate young man; the greedy tyranny and avarice of Mrs. Bute Crawley had caused the old lady to revolt against the exorbitant pretensions of that part of the family; and though he himself had held off all his life from cultivating Miss Crawley’s friendship, with perhaps an improper pride, he thought now that every becoming means should be taken, both to save her soul from perdition, and to secure her fortune to himself as the head of the house of Crawley."
  • "Rather, the self-publisher of local history has several built-in advantages from the start: his audience is highly concentrated, that audience tends to gravitate naturally toward sources of new material, and the demand for works of local history generally equals or exceeds the supply (or put another way, the self-publisher of a new work usually has few if any direct subject-matter competitors)."